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Home | Tanzania Development Gateway - Topics Contents

Page 7 of 8
91. The dynamic relationship between property rights, water resource management and poverty in the Lake Victoria Basin
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  This review aims to synthesize information on the dynamic relationships between property rights to land and natural resources, water resource management and poverty in the Lake Victoria Basin of East Africa. It focuses on the way in which water management systems, under the conceptual umbrella of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), address customary claims to land and water.
 
92. Ecosystem: Eastern Arc Mountains and Coastal Forests of Tanzania and Kenya - Briefing Book
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  The Eastern Arc Mountains and Coastal Forests of Tanzania and Kenya region runs along the coasts of these two East African countries and includes Zanzibar. The region has two distinct habitats - the Coastal Forests and the Eastern Arc Mountains. Together, they harbor at least 1,500 plant species found nowhere else, as well as unique mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. There are 333 globally threatened species, including the Critically Endangered Aders duiker (Cephalophus adersi) and the Endangered Zanzibar or Kirks red colobus (Procolobus kirkii), found only in Zanzibars Jozani Forest.
 
93. Ecosystem: Eastern Arc Mountains & Coastal forests of Tanzania & Kenya
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) is designed to safeguard the world's threatened biodiversity hotspots in developing countries. It is a joint initiative of Conservation International (CI), the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. CEPF supports projects in hotspots, the biologically richest and most endangered areas on Earth.
A fundamental purpose of CEPF is to ensure that civil society is engaged in efforts to conserve biodiversity in the hotspots. An additional purpose is to ensure that those efforts complement existing strategies and frameworks established by local, regional and national governments.
 
94. Economic and Social Council - Sanitation: policy options and possible actions to expedite implementation
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  The sanitation target contained in the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg Plan of Implementation) represents a strong political commitment of national Governments to reduce
significantly, with the support of the international community, the proportion of
people who do not have access to basic sanitation. Sanitation is beginning to be
recognized as a national development priority that needs to be supported by adequate
policies and budgetary allocations.
 
95. TANZANIA: Investment and environment outlook
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  This Outlook has been prepared in the context of the project Strategies and mechanisms for promoting cleaner production investments in developing countries”, financed by the government of Norway and implemented by the Division of Technology, Industry and Economics of UNEP. The project has a global component and demonstration activities are carried out in five pilot countries.: Guatemala, Nicaragua, Tanzania, Vietnam and Zimbabwe.
 
96. Making community-based forest management work: A case study of Duru-Haitemba village forest reserve, Babati, Tanzania
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  Tanzania, like most other developing countries in Africa, has in recent years been
fighting a losing battle in trying to protect vast areas of woodlands and natural forests
scattered around the country. Consequently, forest resources in the country have
been subjected to increasing pressure of exploitation. The government capacity to
protect forests and woodlands has progressively declined with reduction in budgets
 
97. Strategies for meeting international water supply and sanitation targets
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  International development targets to halve both the proportion of people lacking access to safe water and the proportion lacking access to sanitation present huge challenges to the international community. However, WaterAid believes they are achievable, provided actors at all levels prioritise services to the poor and resources are both increased and used more effectively.
 
98. Decentralization Process and its Impact on Environmental and Natural Resources Management in Tanzania
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  Decentralization is commonly viewed as the transfer of legal and political authority from
the central government and its agencies to the field organizations and institutions. This
review analyzes the process, institutional and legal framework within which the environmental and natural resources management operates in Tanzania. It specifically focuses on the decentralization within central and local governments role in environmental management.
 
99. Critical ecosystem partnership fun: Eastern Arc Mountains and Coastal
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  The Eastern Arc Mountains and Coastal Forests of Tanzania and Kenya region runs along the coasts of these two East African countries and includes
Zanzibar. The region has two distinct habitats - the Coastal Forests and the Eastern Arc Mountains. Together, they harbor at least 1,500 plant species found nowhere else, as well as unique mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.
 
100. Private Sector Investment in Marine Conservation:
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  Chumbe Island Coral Park Ltd (CHICOP), established in 1991 and probably the first fully functioning Marine Protected Area (MPA) in Tanzania, illustrates issues for a privately created and managed marine protected area in East Africa. Investment and fisheries legislation and the institutional environment of Zanzibar (Tanzania) made the park possible, but required higher investment than anticipated.
 
101. Access to environmental information in Tanzania
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  A Tanzanian citizen's right to obtain and impart information is enshrined in the constitution. Thus, by interpretation at least, the right of citizens to access environmental information is ensured. In practice, however, Tanzanians rarely enjoy this right. Despite the constitutional mandate, the government often has not informed the public and has at times even misled people about decisions and projects that could potentially degrade the environment, threaten livelihoods, and endanger health.
 
102. Financing, Revenue-Sharing, and Taxation Issues in Wildlife Management Areas
  Thursday, November 24, 2005  by Admin
  In 1999, Tanzania.s Wildlife Division in the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism initiated the development of guidelines for the establishment of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs).The recent history of the development of these WMA guidelines goes back to the mid-1990s. The Wildlife Policy of Tanzania, issued by the Government in 1998, envisages local communities taking greater responsibility for the management and utilization of wildlife resources in village lands.
 
103. Population, environment and development in 2001
  Tuesday, October 25, 2005  by Admin
  Total population. The twentieth century witnessed an extraordinary growth of world population from 1.6 billion in 1900 to 6.1 billion in 2001, with almost 80 per cent of that increase having occurred since 1950. It took only 12 years (1987 to 1999) for the world to add the most recent billion people, the shortest period in world history for a billion people to be added. The less developed regions account for 80 per cent of the worlds inhabitants.
 
104. Population, Environment and Development
  Tuesday, October 25, 2005  by Admin
  The twentieth century has been a century of unprecedented population growth, economic development and environmental change. From
1900 to 2000, world population grew from 1.6 billion to 6.1 billion persons (United Nations, 2001a). However, while world population increased
close to 4 times, world real gross domestic product (GDP) increased 20 to 40 times (DeLong, 1998), allowing the world not only to sustain a fourfold population increase, but also to do so at vastly higher standards of living.
 
105. Tanzanias Coffee Sector: Constraints and Challenges in a Global Environment
  Tuesday, October 25, 2005  by Admin
  Coffee, Tanzanias largest export crop, contributes about $115 to the countrys export
earnings. About 95 percent of coffee is produced by some 400,000 smallholders on average plots of 1-2 hectares. Most do not use purchased inputs such as chemicals and fertilizer. Before 1990 all coffee marketing (including input provision, transportation, and processing) was handled by the state coffee board and the cooperative unions.
 

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