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Home | Tanzania Development Gateway - Indigenious Knowledge: Culture
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Hadzabe saga takes strange twist
The government is investigating alleged violations of human rights against the Hadzabe ethnic group committed by social researchers, tour firms, filmmakers and some non-governmental organizations. Mbulu District Commissioner Elias Goroi said the activities of tour firms, film makers, social researchers and NGOs operating within Hadzabe territory at Yaeda Chini and Lake Eyasi basin were being probed.
Contributed on:5/22/2007 1:52:40 AM By:

Turning to Indigenous Languages for Increased Citizen Participation in the African Development Process
Development is a concept that has attracted the attention of economic theorists, political leaders and other policy-makers, as well as scholars from other fields. This paper endeavours a discussion on what ought to be the central role of language in the African development process.
Contributed on:6/21/2006 10:21:55 AM By: Sangai Mohochi

Concept Note for Meeting on Indigenous Peoples and Indicators of Well Being
Within the global system, there are numerous indicators currently being utilized for measuring progress in governance, policy and programming terms. The UN system and its member states are currently gearing their programming for the achievement of the millennium development goals. The formulation of these goals and the targets indicators, however, do not include the participation of indigenous peoples, resulting in protection of their lands, resources and traditional knowledge.
Contributed on:5/18/2006 10:26:29 AM By: Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Working to End Violence against Indigenous Women
The United Nations estimates that one out of every three women around the world has been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused in her lifetime—usually by someone she knows.
Contributed on:5/8/2006 4:48:38 AM By: MADRE

Indigenous Women and Sustainable Development
Indigenous Peoples have fought for centuries against genocide, displacement, colonization, and forced assimilation, preserving their cultures and their identities as distinct Peoples. Today, Indigenous Peoples, who occupy some of the last pristine environments on Earth, are at the forefront of the struggle against corporate globalization and privatization of natural resources.
Contributed on:5/8/2006 4:34:21 AM By: MADRE

Indigenous Women and Sustainable Development
Indigenous Peoples have fought for centuries against genocide, displacement, colonization, and forced assimilation, preserving their cultures and their identities as distinct Peoples. Today, Indigenous Peoples, who occupy some of the last pristine environments on Earth, are at the forefront of the struggle against corporate globalization and privatization of natural resources.
Contributed on:5/8/2006 4:33:58 AM By: MADRE

Wasting sperm: The Cultural Context of Condom use among the Maasai
The 'ABC' approach to HIV risk reduction is the widely used model for the HIV prevention programme. This study argues there is a need to move away from the narrow focus on sexual behaviour to a broader one incorporating sexual behavious as just one dimension.
Contributed on:12/13/2005 7:27:25 AM By: Admin

Transfer of Ethnoverterinary Knowledge (EVK)
The practice of EVK is more common among elders in teh community due to the fact that they have greater experience of diseases and a wider knowledge of the methods used to treat them.
Contributed on:10/14/2004 7:22:51 AM By: Ethnovertenary Knowledge Project 2001
More Information

Sukuma Culture and Tanzania
The Sukuma culture is the largest in Tanzania. In many ways, the Sukuma are experiencing a renewed interest in traditional culture. Some think that the strength of this movement is found in the reconciliation of the modern and traditional. Cultural traditions appear to be spreading through contemporary means and not as a contest between the old and the new. Sukuma traditional arts and culture are thriving as much as the economic growth in the region.
Contributed on:10/6/2004 1:18:02 AM By: http://philip.greenspun.com

Makonde & Tingatinga
This site is a tribute to the Makonde of Dar-es-Salaam who have created an unrivalled style of carving mysterious and beautiful sculptures.

Contributed on:10/6/2004 12:41:04 AM By: cowries.info

Makonde Art and Craft
Makonde are Bantu speaking people who live in both northeastern Mozambique and southeastern Tanzania. The Makonde clans originally lived in Mozambique. Due to a lack of land and food, some of them moved to Tanzania in the middle of the 20th century. Their economy is still primarily based on slash-and-burn agriculture, supplemented by hunting; corn (maize), sorghum, and cassava are the major crops.
Contributed on:10/5/2004 12:48:46 PM By: Makone Art

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